Earths miracle animals

Healthy soil is the basis for healthy food. This is also the belief of our partner Ingleby Farms, who is actively working to reduce the use of pesticides . With their technological shift to spot spraying, the company is contributing to a more sustainable agriculture, and the effects of that go all the way underground.

Unfortunately, we often pay little attention to what lies beneath our feet, yet it is precisely the small things that have the greatest effect. For example, small microorganisms and insects benefit from a healthy soil and at the same time increase the yield and quality of the fruit – a true win-win situation.

Worms – the best employees underground

This is exactly what Ingleby Farms believes. Earthworms are not only a support for agriculture, they are also essential for our plants and the planet.

They improve the soil structure by building small tunnels under the ground with their movements. That way, they create better ventilation of the soil. More oxygen and nutrients are transported deep into the ground. Also, the soil becomes more stable and can absorb more water – according to a study, up to ten times faster than a wormless soil.[1]

But it is not only the soil that benefits from the little miracle animals, the plants do, too. The tunnels in the soil allow the roots of the plants to grow deep into the earth and reach more nutrients and water. In addition, earthworms decompose dead foliage and their excretions provide important nutrients for plants.[2]

There are over 3,000 different species of worms worldwide, some of which are threatened with extinction and are on the IUCN Red List.[3]

Ingleby Farms is committed to improve their soils by reducing their pesticide use and practice regenerative farming principles, and they help their soil microorganisms thrive by ensuring food and habitat in the form of diverse, continuous plant cover and reduce soil disturbance.

  1. https://inglebyfarms.com/farming-with-nature/ecosystem-engineers/
  2. https://inglebyfarms.com/farming-with-nature/why-we-feed-microbiology/
  3. https://www.naturefund.de/artikel/news/der_lebenswichtige_regenwurm
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